Science

The Dark Side of the Summer of Love

Researching for my talk at TEDx this year, I came across scanned pages of this superb article in Playboy magazine. Who knew what crazy stuff was out there on the Interwebs?! Seriously, it’s a very fine piece that gets under the skin of what was really going on at the time, through the story of a

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A Theology of Human Machines | Solving the ‘Modest Problem of Death’

A fascinating read in the latest New Republic, reviewing Irish writer Mark O’Connor’s new book, To Be A Machine – subtitled ‘Adventures among Cyborgs, Utopians, Hackers and Futurists Solving the Modest Problem of Death.’ Anna Wiener writes: O’Connell is less interested in evaluating technology than in the people who make it and its philosophical implications. As he

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Hans Rosling

So sad to hear of his death yesterday. This video – that I’ve used countless times in lessons – captures the man and his message perfectly. A brilliant communicator.   –//– Click here to receive updates, and hear first about new projects

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In Our Time | The Best Free Education on the Planet | Welcoming Caitlin Moran

Have said it too many times I know, but the BBC Radio 4 show In Our Time is, I’m convinced, the single best free education available on the planet. Expert discussions on art, philosophy, history, mathematics, science and religion…  Hence no surprise to read Caitlin Moran’s confession of her IoT addiction in The Times this

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Books, Virtual Reality, Imagination and the Inner Eye

The bookshop Waterstones tweeted a joke yesterday in which Mark Zuckerberg went into their shop on Oxford Street: ‘What’s this?’ he said, holding up a book. ‘It’s a book,’ I replied. He looked at it for five minutes before asking what it does. ‘Well,’ I said. ‘You look at it and it kind of shows

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The Trauma of the Infinite

In a recent post examining notions of time and our relationship to it, Peter Rollins concluded: Instead of the eternal being simply the ongoing now (the pagan notion), this understanding sees the eternal as the dwelling in all three registers. This is nothing less than the combining of past, present and future into a mass

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Better Living Through Chemistry? Love, Depression and Pharmacology

Last night I went to see The Effect at the National Theatre, a new play by Lucy Prebble, who made waves with her previous piece ENRON. (It ‘stars’ Billie Piper, who I’d not seen on stage before but – just as an aside – her performance confirmed so much that I’d heard: she’s a very

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All In The Mind? Thoughts on Identity and Neuroscience

Tweeted about this piece earlier today, but wanted to flag up and reflect further on Henry Marsh’s piece in Granta, detailing his neurosurgical work operating on a tumour in a pineal gland. The pineal gland is buried deep within the brain, and is thus only reached after a perilous journey through the physical matter that

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A Very Modern Decathlon: Who Would Win the ‘Whole Person’ Olympic Gold?

  One of the things I liked about Tom Wolfe’s novel I Am Charlotte Simmons is the journey that one of the main characters, Jojo, takes, from ‘dumb college jock’ to athletic student of philosophy. It’s an arc that’s not that uncommon: the pursuit of excellence in sport requires careful reflection on the self; top

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